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Overcoming Overeating

[ website | Women's Campaign To End Body Hatred and Dieting ]
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International No Diet Day [May. 6th, 2011|11:35 am]
Overcoming Overeating

sarahmichigan

Happy International No Diet Day!

Links for anyone interested:
Adios Barbie! blog entry about INND

Fat Girls Float blog entry and round-up of more links about INND

TODAY ONLY: Free E-Book Download In Honor Of International No Diet Day!

x-posed to a couple groups...


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Overcoming Overeating mention in Psychotherapy Networker [Aug. 12th, 2010|04:48 pm]
Overcoming Overeating

sarahmichigan
I was really excited to see Judith Matz, director of the Chicago Center for Overcoming Overeating, writing an article for Psychotherapy Networker about intuitive eating and non-dieting, especially since psychologists and other mental health professionals have just as many (or more) prejudices against fat people and misconceptions about why people are fat and/or overeat as the general public.

In Consultation: Beyond the Diet Mentality
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Linda Bacon's "Health at Every Size" book [Apr. 2nd, 2009|09:53 am]
Overcoming Overeating

sarahmichigan
I recently read Linda Bacon's new book, "Health at Every Size: The Surprising Truth about your Weight" and  reviewed it here, if anyone is interested.

Her book and the Overcoming Overeating philosophy aren't 100 percent in synch, but there's a lot of value in both, I think. Bacon gives some recommendations for healthy eating- she is, after all, a nutritionist by training. But, she also believes in "unrestrained eating," which is a fundamental of OO.

Also, one complaint I've heard against the OO approach to eating is that people can't follow their hungry/full signals because they're not in touch with them. I think Bacon gives some really great concrete advice and exercise for getting in touch with your hungry/full signals in the book.

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Article on non-dieting and size acceptance [Feb. 12th, 2009|12:31 pm]
Overcoming Overeating

sarahmichigan
I had an article published recently in which I outline various Alternatives to Dieting.

The "overcoming overeating" philosophy is just one of several I touched on. I also talked about Health at Every Size (HAES), size acceptance and body positivity, intuitive eating, and other related ideas. Thought some of you folks here might find the links in the article useful.

I think I'm going to find it useful because I've collected some of my favorite links in one place. I think it'd be a good place to point someone who is just beginning to think twice about diets and is dipping his or her foot in the pool of non-dieting, body image issues, and the like.



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Review of "Rethinking Thin" [May. 21st, 2008|08:11 am]
Overcoming Overeating

sarahmichigan
I recently finished "Rethinking Thin" by Gina Kolata, and I see why it's becoming a new favorite in the size acceptance movement. Kolata, though thin and athletic herself, is empathetic and really "gets" it. Her research is impeccable, and the book is extremely readable. If you've ever thought that maybe your efforts to get thin failed because you just didn't have enough willpower, I strongly urge you to read this book, because the picture is a lot more complicated than that.

I reviewed it in more detail here.
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Happy No Diet Day! [May. 6th, 2008|06:41 am]
Overcoming Overeating

sarahmichigan
It's that time of year again. Sandy has a nice piece.

Can we go a day without disparaging our bodies?
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Holiday pressures & emotional eating [Dec. 19th, 2007|01:40 pm]
Overcoming Overeating

sarahmichigan
A friend was asking on her journal how others deal with taking care of yourself and feeding yourself well during the holidays. I am reposting my thoughts here. I'd also be interested to know what you all do to take care of yourself and deal with pressure (internal or external) to eat emotionally or from social pressure during the holidays.

My comment:

I try to pare down to what is really essential and don't let myself get guilted into do too much or going too many places or eating food I don't want.

If I like a holiday tradition, I do it. If it feels like too much work, I don't. If I have the energy to travel, I do. If I don't have the energy, I don't.

I try to keep on the same food/exercise/sleep schedule that I'm usually on to minimize fatigue but don't beat myself up if my eating or exercise habits get a little out of whack.

I plan at least one day around the holidays where I can just chill and don't have ANY responsibilities.

In regard to food, I keep in mind that:
-I don't have to eat sweets that I don't care for just because they're there or to avoid hurting someone's feelings, but I DO eat any sweets that appeal to me without guilt so I don't feel deprived.
-I don't have to gobble all the holiday foods right this minute because if I really want them some other time, I can make them or buy them. It's not the law that you can only have pumpkin pie at Thanksgiving and candy canes at Christmas.
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How were the holidays for you? [Nov. 26th, 2007|07:35 am]
Overcoming Overeating

sarahmichigan
Holidays can be a big challenge for some trying an intuitive eating approach because there's SO much social pressure around food at the holidays. In my case, my family tends to swing between crazy diets and food-pushing. This holiday was about the food-pushing. It wasn't too obnoxious, but I felt like we were pressured to eat on other people's schedules, and demand feeding wasn't very easy in the environment we were in (the family met up at a resort where most restaurants were closed, and the few food options were pretty expensive). I ended up a little over-full after Thanksgiving dinner and was really hungry without many options for food by the time we went to bed later that day, so that wasn't ideal for me.

There was also some pressure to "try some of this, eat a little of this, don't you just want a bite?" For the most part, I did OK sticking to my guns, and I feel pretty good about how it went, mostly. 

But, I also have a physical with a new doctor coming up today, and between the weird off-schedule eating of the holiday and worrying about getting a weight lecture from the new doctor, I've been having a bit of a rough time the last few days with body image issues.

How were food, weight, and body image issues for you this holiday season?
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No "good foods", no "bad foods" [Oct. 16th, 2007|04:20 pm]
Overcoming Overeating

sarahmichigan
Some of you are probably already reading Sandy Swarcz's awesome health blog "Junkfood Science." If not, I recommend it, as her messages about "Enjoy food and don't worry!" and "People come naturally in all shapes and sizes!" dovetail nicely with the OO philosophy.

This one re-inforces what OO says about "legalizing" all foods and not putting foods into two categories, one for "good food" and one for "bad food":

http://junkfoodscience.blogspot.com/2007/10/junkfood-science-exclusive-big-one.html

Excerpt:
... the women following a “healthy” diet for 8 years didn’t end up thinner. They lost a bit at the beginning, but had regained it back years before the end of the trial, despite continued restrained eating and eating fewer calories (361 kcal/day less than they had been at the start of the study). During the last years of the trial and at the end, the researchers found an insignificant difference in weight changes between the intervention and control group of a mere 0.7 kg. They concluded: "A low-fat eating pattern does not result in weight gain in postmenopausal women."

More significantly, those in the control group who were not “watching what they ate” and were eating whatever they wanted didn’t gain weight, even though through the end of the trial they were eating more calories and fat than the dieters.
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